Pot activists denounce police crackdown

Pot activists denounce police crackdown

Clyde King, a Mohawk man from Six Nations who is in the process of establishing his own medical marijuana dispensary, says that the raids leave him and his partner “undeterred.” King notes that recent events “haven’t changed my mind about the need to open a medical cannabis dispensary on Six Nations.” King adds “as for who they raided and who they didn’t raid, I believe the raids were motivated by the Licensed Producers. The raids are about control and taxes under the guise of health and safety."

An interview with Hazel Hill on the HDI

An interview with Hazel Hill on the HDI

SIX NATIONS – There has been a lot of controversy over the Haudenosaunee Development Institute (HDI), a creation of the Haudenosaunee Chiefs Confederacy Council in Six Nations. So Kelly MacNaughton and Tom Keefer invited Hazel Hill, HDI director, to join the Ka:nikonhriyo Podcast and hear directly from her about what is going on with the HDI. 

Indigenize or Die: Reclaiming cities and traditional lands

Indigenize or Die: Reclaiming cities and traditional lands

TORONTO – The concrete buildings and streets that surround our Canadian cities hide a history of colonialism as well as vast swaths of green spaces and traditional lands that once flourished. That's why a Metis man is now using traditional Indigenous practices to help others not only reclaim these lands, but to care for them throughout generations. 

The Two Row Times and the HDI

The Two Row Times and the HDI

SIX NATIONS – A very serious political conflict is currently playing itself out at Six Nations. This conflict has been unfolding since the reclamation of Kanonhstaton in 2006, when the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council (HCCC) became the lead group from Six Nations negotiating with the Federal and Provincial governments. The current conflict concerns fundamental issues of political authority within Six Nations and thus ultimately the question of whether an Onkwehon:we political system or a colonial system devised by the British empire should govern the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory.

Amai Kuda "We Can Do It! (Dirty Money)" (ft. Y, M1 and Kinnie Starr)

Amai Kuda "We Can Do It! (Dirty Money)" (ft. Y, M1 and Kinnie Starr)

Amai Kuda has teamed up with Josephine Y, Kinnie Starr and Dead Prez's M1 for a politically charged new track called "We Can Do It! (Dirty Money)." The group of artists first got together at the Paris Climate Summit last year, and since collaborated to create a song that stands in solidarity with Decolonize NOW! — a coalition dedicated to supporting the causes of Black and Indigenous communities and "the protection of the earth and her peoples."

A hate crime in Tyendinaga

A hate crime in Tyendinaga

TYENDINAGA MOHAWK TERRITORY – On Saturday April 30th, Ohaheyo, a 24 year old Kanyen’kéhaka (Mohawk) man was the victim of a hate crime. He attended a party that a group of white people were having at the quarry in Tyendinaga. At one point he was accused of stealing beer from another party-goer, and the situation escalated into a conflict in which Ohaheyo was severely beaten, almost thrown into the quarry waters (which could have been fatal) and was repeatedly called "faggot" as he was severely beaten. Ohaheyo suffered a collapsed lung, fractured ribs, a fractured eye socket, and severe bruising across his face and body.

(Re)Occupied: #OccupyINAC and British Columbia’s 1975 Militant May

(Re)Occupied: #OccupyINAC and British Columbia’s 1975 Militant May

When approximately thirty members of the Idle No More and Black Lives Matter movements entered the Indigenous and Northern Affairs (INAC) office in Toronto on April 13, 2016 to protest government inaction on the suicide crisis in Attawapiskat, the group, calling itself #OccupyINAC was drawing on long established political strategies. Indigenous peoples have occupied Indian Affairs offices before. Perhaps the most well-known was the 1972 American Indian Movement (AIM) occupation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) headquarters in Washington, DC. The BIA takeover concluded the Trail of Broken Treaties—a cross-country march organized to protest broken treaty promises and the poor living conditions of Native American peoples across the country. When the caravan reached Washington, 500 American Indians took over the BIA office, destroyed records, and began a seven-day occupation, during which they presented AIM’s“Twenty Point” position paper to President Nixon, listing their demands. Less well known are the occupations that occurred in British Columbia three years later.

Every Mohawk a Suspect

Every Mohawk a Suspect

KANEHSATAKE — “You didn’t see anything?” my neighbour asks. Apparently, another big police raid is taking place. We stop to listen for a second but hear nothing. Nobody phoned. I hadn’t listened to the radio all morning. I’ve been mowing the lawn. I haven’t seen or heard anything unusual. I haven’t seen a single police car. Looking up, we hear a helicopter. It doesn’t sound like a police chopper. We’ve learned to distinguish the sounds of military, police and civilian helicopters.

Behind the Scenes at #OccupyINAC

Behind the Scenes at #OccupyINAC

TORONTO – Gary Wassaykeesic recently sat down with Real Peoples Media to tell the story of how INAC Toronto was occupied and what led to the #occupyINAC movement. Wassaykeesic explains the linkages of the movement to the Black Lives Matter tent city in Toronto, and what the action felt like from the inside. Wassaykeesic is from Mishkeegogamang First Nation which is located several hours north of Thunder Bay. 

May Day and the Woodland Epoch of History

May Day and the Woodland Epoch of History

Once upon a time, long before Weinberger bombed north Africans, before the Bank of Boston laundered money, or Reagan honored the Nazi war dead, the earth was blanketed by a broad mantle of forests. As late as Caesar's time a person might travel through the woods for two months without gaining an unobstructed view of the sky. The immense forests of Europe, Asia, Africa, and America provided the atmosphere with oxygen and the earth with nutrients. Within the woodland ecology our ancestors did not have to work the graveyard shift, or to deal with flextime, or work from Nine to Five. Indeed, the native Americans whom Captain John Smith encountered in 1606 only worked four hours a week. The origin of May Day is to be found in the Woodland Epoch of History.